Pax Cthuliana
3rd Party / December 18, 2017

I’m midway through running the system-free investigation Pax Cthuliana from NEVR publishing (who also publish the Insight RPG). I went through the read through and prep a fortnight ago and ran the first half last Tuesday – which proved sufficient to get a review up and posted on Geek Native. I mention in the review that the adventure would work fine without a system – all loosey goosey and story-focused – but, at the same time, it doesn’t take too much to nudge a little crunch in around the defined locations and meetings with personalities. You have a bucket-load of superb quality handouts and clues to pass on to the gathered investigators, but that’s not to say they should pay for the insight with a measured taxing of their Resource Dice, using The Cthulhu Hack. I can see where the Kickstarter money went on this adventure – because few games have such fine play materials and certainly don’t usually stretched to a purpose-written original soundtrack. As I suggest in the Geek Native review, you can do something more yourself with scattered props and red herring paperwork on the tabletop – as you can do with any game. The visceral, hands-on experience…

Debate Night in America
3rd Party , Adventures / November 8, 2016

Two powerful figures square up for a final debate certain to spell defeat for one – and recent media attention seems to have swung hard one way. The investigators have a chance to uncover the truth, but they have precious little time to do it and an immovable deadline looming. I’ve been a fan of Nathan Hill since I picked up a copy of his excellent sci-fi game Foreign Element – and then ran an adventure on a suspiciously orange planet. Nathan has chosen a particularly apposite moment to release Debate Night in America, an adventure he’s written for The Cthulhu Hack, but suited to any game of conspiracy-fuelled, supernaturally-steeped investigation. The adventure invites a sense of impending doom in a very strict, tight timeline – and I might even suggest you could swing something close to an actual countdown by running it at a pace of 15 or 20 minutes real time equals 60 minutes game time. An actual clock on the table that you advance, with the absolute certainty that the televised debate goes ahead at 7PM – that should have the players focused and increasingly frantic. Entirely viable as a one-shot for an evening or a convention game. I…